LA Cops use copyrighted music to prevent filming

In a strange twist of musically enhanced events, police officers in LA have been caught using copyrighted music from bands like The Beatles and Sublime to prevent video footage from protestors remaining online. 

In an act that weaponises the copyright laws on social media video and image sharing sites such as Instagram, LA cops have been seen using their phones to play music that will be picked up in protestors recordings and subsequently force the removal of their videos from the online sphere. 

Police officers in Beverly Hills have been reached out to by VICE news, the online news agency that first picked up the story. In a comment to the news site they have said “the playing of music while accepting a complaint or answering questions is not a procedure that has been recommended by Beverly Hills Police command staff.” They have also commented that the videos of the police officers are under review by the department. 

LA resident Sennett Devermont is the protestor whose videos are in question. He runs the account @sennettd on Instagram where he often films his interactions with the police, and also shares to his second verified account @mrcheckpoint_. With over 350 thousand followers between the two accounts the story was picked up widely across social media networks, with many people condemning the police officer’s actions. 

The police officer in question is BHPD Sergeant Billy Fair who attempts to play Sublime’s ‘Santeria’ in one video and ‘Yesterday’ by The Beatles in another. The obvious attempt to disrupt Devermont’s First Amendment right to film police officers is both crude and mostly ineffective according to Instagram’s copyright laws since the songs are played single use and are not the main feature of the video meaning they should be allowed by the algorithm. Instagram has not responded to comment when reached out to.

Blackpink light up Netflix

The Korean four piece pop band Blackpink are the latest musical debuts to have a Netflix documentary made following their rise to stardom and current band activities. Unless you’ve been actively ignoring the news for several years now, the exponential growth in popularity for all things Korean has seen the genre dubbed K-pop take hold in fans’ hearts and minds around the world. Now, alongside stars like Taylor Swift and Beyonce, the K-pop darlings Blackpink are the latest sonic act to receive a dubious level of fame warranting their own Netflix documentary. 

The documentary titled ‘Blackpink: Light Up The Sky’ was released on the online digital streaming platform on October 14th 2020. It reached fans in three languages – English, Korean and Thai, a fact that should have been obvious to expect since it reflects the national demographics of the band itself. Whilst known as one of Korea’s biggest exports, Blackpink is distinctive for its collage of nationalities from its members, at once bringing a diversity of experience to the band itself at the same time as increasing their audience reach even further and making them potentially even more popular than counterparts such as boyband BTS and solo act Psy that have equally made their marks on the world stage. 

In the Netflix documentary audiences are provided with an all access pass backstage on the band’s latest world tour, getting to know each of the band members through direct insight into their unique personalities, as well as seeing group dynamics at work. Adam Del Deo, Vice President of Documentary Features at Netflix noted the documentary for its “organic and honest moments that give viewers an authentic inside look into the lives of Blackpink, as well as the dedication and gruelling preparation each member puts into every hit song, history-making performance and sold-out arena tour.”

TikTok viral video sends 19th century sea shanty into UK charts Top 40

2021 has seen the unlikely success of the 19th century sea shanty ‘The Wellerman’ as a TikTok video gone viral has sent it soaring into the UK charts Top 40. Sailing in at no. 37, ‘The Wellerman’ original version is a heart-warming earworm known to many – though perhaps not by name for most. The previously niche world of the sea shanty singing community has been pleasantly surprised by the amount of attention received recently as a result, with social media users taking the time to create their own versions of the song, often with a 2021 coronavirus twist. 

Premiered on July 16th July 2020, the video that has sent the shanty into the charts is a version by a UK group The Longest Johns from the seaside city of Bristol. Now with nearly a quarter of a million views on YouTube the video has become unprecedentedly popular and heard around the world. The craze was then picked up on TikTok where users would supplement the shanty’s old-time lyrics for more modern versions. 

With more people around the world online this past year due to coronavirus lockdown restrictions, it’s unsurprising the internet has reached such depths of musical history. What’s more, the song’s bleak but hopeful lyrics are almost a sign of the times as of a group of sailors awaiting sweet gifts from said ‘Wellerman’, free themselves from a trapping with a whale. It’s easy to imagine people hoping to be free soon of the coronavirus’ grip and enjoying life’s more pleasurable delights again instead. 

The original shanty is thought to date back to the early 1830s and have originated in Australia or New Zealand. The short song style remains popular to this day, with yearly festivals such as the Falmouth Sea Shanty Festival in the UK, which will also take place online this year due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Neil Young sells off 50% of his back catalogue

Old time rocker Neil Young was once a critique of other ageing musicians who he felt had ‘sold out’. However, with the turmoil of 2020 and the future looking more uncertain, it’s no surprise ageing rockstar Neil Young has chosen to sell off the rights to 50% of his back catalogue. 

The British investment company Hipgnosis has bought the 50% of rights to Young’s songs, after spending over $1 billion already in the purchasing of other famous singer and bands back albums. The deal is reported to have been worth $150 million and to give Hipgnosis the rights to nearly 1,200 songs. The songs range from his solo career with the Crazy Horse backing band, through other periods of his life such as the Nash & Young era, as well as his time as Buffalo Springfield.

In the last two years Hipgnosis has also purchased other ageing stars back catalogues such as  Lindsey Buckingham, whose albums include songs from with Fleetwood Mac as well as his solo career. The founder of Hipgnosis Songs Fund, Merck Mercuriadis, says that he will protect and preserve the back catalogue of Young. Mercuriadis has previously been known as the manager for megastars like Beyonce, Elton John and Guns N’ Roses. Other back catalogue acquisitions from Hipgnosis also include the likes of others such as Steve Winwood and Blondie, as well as producers such as Jimmy Lovine, who worked with artists including Bruce Springsteen and U2.

The not so young 75 year old musician has previously been noted for his reported criticisms over the music industry. Young is one of many musicians to declare a perceived commercialisation of the music industry and a resulting negative consequential effect. 

The deal is part of a trend in big music companies buying up rights to back catalogues following Stevie Nicks selling 80% of her back catalogue to Primary Wave, and Bob Dylan’s staggering deal with the Universal Music Group

Lana Del Rey bombarded by frothing armchair activists

Looks like Lana Del Rey has been consigned by the internet to the celebrity Nazi club (from which very few return). As I wrote a few months ago, she was raked over the coals by social media people for wearing a ridiculous mesh mask during a book signing. It was a stupid thing to do, but the reaction was a little over the top. Now it seems she’s done herself in for good.

Business Insider writes that “Fans have turned on Lana Del Rey” and that “the singer ruined her own reputation.” Vulture states that “Lana Del Rey is only speaking for herself now.” Which is pretty silly—is she expected to speak for other people too? The Daily Beast, a trashy internet tabloid that would make William Hearst blush, says that “Lana Del Rey can’t stop putting her foot in her mouth.” Over at the Independent, we’re told Del Rey “has always been problematic.” After I write this post I’m going to send a package via Fast Courier Australia.

In other words, there is a coordinated media effort to portray the singer as someone who no longer deserves popular support. Why? Because, among other things, the cover art for her new album, Chemtrails Over The Country Club, features too many white people. It’s an image of a bunch of women—her friends—sitting around a table wearing heels and dresses. Most appear to be white, one looks black, and a few look as though they might be Hispanic. Which apparently makes Del Rey a white supremacist or something. She was forced to “defend” the cover against race-obsessed weirdos on social media.

“As it happens,” she wrote, “when it comes to my amazing friends and this cover, yes, there are people of color on this record’s picture and that’s all I’ll say about that. But thank you.”

What a bigot.

As I said, the album cover is just one of several problems. Del Rey has also mentioned Beyonce and Cardi B in a statement about sex in music (which means she must be a hardcore Nazi), and keeps on saying she’s not racist (which makes her a racist liar). She also implied that rappers generally happen to be black, which is, like, KKK-level stuff. Most recently she gave her opinion regarding the Trumpist attack on the US Capitol building last week.

“You know,” she said, “he doesn’t know that he’s inciting a riot and I believe that.” She added that in her view Trump has “delusions of grandeur.” Then:

“The madness of Trump… As bad as it was, it really needed to happen. We really needed a reflection of our world’s greatest problem, which is not climate change but sociopathy and narcissism. Especially in America. It’s going to kill the world. It’s not capitalism, it’s narcissism.”

For that she got hammered yet again. So now she’s a fascist Trump supporter in addition to everything else. Despite having voted against Trump and condemning him as a sociopath. It doesn’t matter; the crazed mob has spoken. Steve Bannon, Lana Del Rey … what’s the difference?

Classic hits take over the charts this Christmas

Prior to 2014 song charts were measured via the number of sales. Artists competed in both albums and single charts to sell the most possible records and reach the much elusive top spot. This often meant domination by mass media outlets such as X Factor and The Voice, touting that year’s show winner as the all too predictable Christmas number one. 

Come 2014 however and the Official Chart Company switched to a streaming metric, radically changing the Christmas number one landscape. Instead of that year’s hit new music, older Christmas classics flourished from the shadows into the limelight as they play on repeat in homes and businesses throughout December. This move was only cemented in 2018 when video downloads and streams were also incorporated into the metric. 

So 2020 comes along and what does it mean to hold a Christmas number one anymore? Is it contemporary popularity or are we staying true to the earworms that continue to hold onto our festive hearts? 

Mariah Carey – All I want for Christmas is you 

An unsurprising number one this year has been Mariah Carey’s iconic ‘All I want for Christmas is You’. Originally released in 1994, the song has been going strong as a yuletide classic for 16 years, continuing to peak in the chart each festive season. 

Bing Crosby / Michael Bubble – It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas

Another Christmas classic set to get even the biggest scrooge in the mood is the historic tune ‘It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas’. Often used to set a festive tone to the beginning of the season, Bing Crosby’s 1951 hit has been immortalised with its further popularisation by crooner Michael Bubble’s 2015 cover. 

Brenda Lee – Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree
One for being in the full swing of Christmas, Brenda Lee went head to head with Bing Crosby in 1951 with her Christmas release of ‘Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree’. With its upbeat and jolly melody the classic yuletide continues to inspire us with festive cheer well into the 21st century.

Best new songs for Christmas 2020

The contest for Christmas Number 1 in the single charts has been a historically epic battle from bands and singers of the day. While in the past shows like X Factor have used their winter timing to send their winners to Christmas number one and dominate the market, a mixture of seeming decline in the popularity and predictability of such shows combined with an switch in metrics to use the number of online streams a song has had instead has caused a significant change. No longer the domain of a new hit single, online streaming capabilities have seen old classics such as Mariah Carey’s ‘All I want for Christmas is You’ topping the charts this year and retaining their prevalence in the top 10 throughout December. 

So what’s new in the charts?

For those sick of the same old earworms never fear! One silver lining of 2020 has seen many artists lockdown and with not much else to do but create so there is an abundance of new music to soothe your sonic desires this Christmas. 

JoJo – Wishlist 

After many years hiatus JoJo is back this year with a second album release of 2020 and it’s stronger than ever! The winter themed album is perfect for the festive mood with song titles such as Wrap Me Up and North Pole, as well as popular Christmas single Wishlist

Justin Beiber featuring The Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Choir – Holy

A staple of the last few decades on pop charts, Beiber is back this Christmas with a festive collaboration The Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Choir. Taking his 2020 hit Holy with all new meaning the ageing pop star has collaborated with the UK choir to bring a hot and sentimental take on the song. Proceeds raised from the song are set to go in support and recognition of frontline workers this year in the face of the ongoing worldwide coronavirus crises. 

Cher helps save ‘World’s Loneliest Elephant’

It’s an unlikely story that doesn’t seem out of place in 2020, the year of strange and uncertain times, but amongst all the bad news there is always a glimmer of hope to be found. In this case it’s the story of the animal dubbed the ‘World’s Loneliest Elephant’ and chart topping pop singer Cher. 

Dire conditions 

The elephant, named Kaavan, was previously the only Asia elephant to be found in Pakistan’s Islamabad zoo where he has spent many years in unfavourable conditions. The controversial home of the elephant was deemed unsuitable by many and the unsuitable structure he was living in caused him cracked and malformed nails. Kaavan was also noted to be overweight due to a severe lack of exercise, and increasingly lonely since the death of his elephant partner in 2012. Kaavan had originally been a gift to Pakistan from Sri Lanka according to the animal rights organisation Four Paws who have been given the responsibility for removing the elephant after the closure of his zoo. 

A glimmer of hope 

Then along came Cher who joined the campaign to save Kaavan back in 2016, and has since spent much time adding her voice to raise the profile of the campaign to move Kaavan to a sanctuary in Cambodia. Since coming to fame back in the 1960s as part of the pop duo Sonny and Cher, Cher has been an animal rights activist and philanthropist for many years. Her part in the campaign to rescue Kaavan adds a touch of glitter and glam to his happy ending, which has seen him travel in a Russian cargo plane with over 200 kilograms of food to north-west Cambodia. Diagnosed as overweight, Kaavan has been helped by experts to lose over 450 kilograms in preparation for the journey. Cher has also been involved in the making of a documentary following Kaavan in his journey from Pakistan to Cambodia which is expected to be on our screens next year.

Dolly Parton donates $1 million to coronavirus vaccine

It’s not often we hear news of Dolly Parton other than a brief television or cameo appearance here or there, but recently the 9-5 singer has made the news with her contribution to a coronavirus vaccine. The cure is the much hailed 95% effective Moderna vaccine, which Parton has now been credited with funding the critical early stages of. Parton received credit for her donation earlier this year in The New England Journal of Medicine, whose preliminary report on the Moderna vaccine notes Parton for her contribution to the Vanderbilt University Medical Centre. 

An unlikely friendship

The story of how the donation came to be arises from an unlikely friendship between Parton and a Dr. Naji Abumrad, a physician and professor of surgery at the Vanderbilt University Medical Centre. The pair met following an unfortunate – but luckily not too serious – car accident involving Parton in 2013, which left the singer with some minor injuries including a bruised cheek. According to Dr. Abumrad in a radio interview on NPR, the doctor and singer struck up a friendship based on their shared interests in science and current affairs. Their conversations have continued over the years and Parton was keen to contribute to the promising research on a coronavirus vaccine as described by Abumrad. The doctor is also quoted as telling the Washington Post that “Without a doubt in my mind, her funding made the research toward the vaccine go 10 times faster than it would be without it”.

What next?

The Moderna virus vaccine has since gone on to receive a staggering amount of interest thanks to the terrifically positive results of its initial development. It is estimated to have received roughly $1 billion in funding so far and it is hoped the vaccine will also make its way to developing countries in need, helping to end the coronavirus global pandemic crisis just that much sooner. 

Halloween Listening: SAVAGE MODE II [CHOPPED NOT SLOPPED]

After opening at Billboard 200’s top release, 21 Savage and Metro Boomin’s Savage Mode II was reworked and re-released by Houston legend OG Ron C. The release, titled SAVAGE MODE II [CHOPPED NOT SLOPPED] contains 14 songs, all given the Houston chopped and screwed treatment.

Chopped and screwed music started in the 90’s in Houston, pioneered of course by the late DJ Screw. The foundation of the chopped and screwed remix aesthetic lies in reducing the song’s tempo to about 60-70 beats per minute. This dramatically drops the tone of the vocal track. 

On SAVAGE MODE II [CHOPPED NOT SLOPPED], 21 Savage’s matter of fact vocal delivery turns him into a robotic assailant to-be. The reduced tempo unsurprisingly gives the lyrics more time to set in. Classic DJ Screw songs like ‘Tell Me Something Good’ use the technique to accentuate the bleakness, almost to the point of hopelessness, underlying classic rap songs. 

OG Ron C’s move from chopped and screwed to “chopped not slopped” underscores the evolution of screwed music, from the lofi tapes being sold by the thousands out of Screw’s house, to a more pared down blend of chopping, phasing, and of course reverb. This approach makes SAVAGE MODE II [CHOPPED NOT SLOPPED] bleed rather than cry. The grim reality of growing up in a chronically violent neighborhood is just as evident, but there is no question that Savage has reformed his ethics to fit. One for the Halloween season.

The album is available to listen to on most streaming services, including Youtube and Spotify. If you prefer physical releases–which you could even use to try your hand at scratching up yourself, vinyl presses are available for purchase at OG Ron C’s website. The site sells other releases, including RonC’s famous F*ck Action collection, a chopped up RnB LP containing memorable remixes of Twista, Usher, and other notorious street romantics.